So yes, “Fame and Misfortune” is a controversial episode for a number of reasons. Not the least of which is how the episode might have been targeting certain fans who are overly nitpicking, super judgmental, and basically being a “Quibble Pants” (pun and reference to “Stranger Than Fan Fiction” intended).

Let’s set something straight right off the bat. This is not targeting the fandom as a whole. Most fans do appreciate the show for what it is and there are fans that appreciate the show for displaying the Mane Six’s flaws and how the develop over time. No pony is perfect and the song did a great job in expressing that. But yes, some in the fandom do treat and over-analyze the show like it were the NFL or [insert Oscar-winning film here]. It is not either of those things.

There is also the lesson for the show staff in the episode. While they may not be able to change certain people’s attitudes towards episodes (and towards themselves occasionally), they can change the way they deal with such criticism. Granted, that didn’t occur in the episode until late, but it is still a good lesson.

Twilight had the best of intention about publishing the journal, but the best laid plans of mice and ponies go often askew. That leads to another frustration about the episode and the show as a whole—that fans ignore the lessons from the episode in favor of being overly critical and/or, worse, confronting show staff on social media about it. That is something I have addressed before and something I’ll likely have to address again.

Should we take the lessons from the show a bit more to heart? Actually, look around the world for a minute and answer that question yourself. Also, ask yourself this, “Why have so many people, both then and now, been drawn to the show to begin with?” I’ve also said previously that sometimes we need a reminder of why we watch this show to begin with.

I was at BronyCon last weekend I cannot help but feel that despite there not being as many people as there were the last two years, there was still a feeling of great positivity even if it was mostly negative outside the Baltimore Convention Center. Ask yourself this question: Why should “Friendship is Magic” be criticized for trying to teach morals while shows like “The Simpsons” and “Family Guy” are lionized for their cynicism and boorish “humor”.

Yes, there are always consequences when you put your story/thoughts out that that someone will disagree with you and not be the most mature about it. Indeed, there are ways for me to deal with that and some are most professional than others, but just remember that the episode in question was not tarring the fandom as a whole with the same brush. Most fans are appreciative of the show and have been inspired from the show and fan content it has spun off. (One frequent comment at BronyCon last weekend was how there was so much talent around.) There are prices to being famous, but some people can be taxing excessively through being super judgmental.

StatManDan

  • Raffaele Lanza

    Woah. I’ve never seen you doing a follow-up of a review of yours Dan. This episode certainly did something I see.